<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div><blockquote type="cite" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: helvetica; font-size: 13px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); border-left-style: solid; border-width: 1px; margin-left: 0px; padding-left: 10px; "><span>I started a project called Hexp [1], which is an API for easily and<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><br>efficiently creating and manipulating HTML syntax trees. It's already<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><br>quite usable, I'm using it on several smaller projects already.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><br>Hopefully this can form the ground work for a new collection of tools.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span></blockquote></div><p><br></p></div><p>So I've used projects like Erector before, and I have to say that Erector was extremely difficult to use, ironically because it was a real programming library.  Almost immediately, the programmers started working it into patterns that the designers couldn't maintain.  The end result is that programmers found themselves writing almost all of the view code, while the front end developers and designers were hamstrung.  Counter intuitive, but there you go.</p><p>Will.</p></body></html>